7 Wonders

7 Wonders gets 10/10 stars on Savvy Game Night It’s time: time to finally review what is possibly our all-time favorite board game: Seven Wonders. This is the game that first got us into board games, and the one we turn to on so many of our game nights. In the game, each player works to build up one of the 7 Wonders of the World by playing resource, military, science, commerce or civilian cards. Rhodes on 7 Wonders | Savvy Game Night One of the reasons we love 7 Wonders is that the game has a lot of re-playability built in to it. There is no obvious strategy that will work for every single game – a lot of it comes down to which wonders you are next to and how those players are choosing to play. It usually isn’t worth getting into an arms race with Rhodes, for instance, because they get two extra military icons as part of their wonder. I often opt to collect the green science cards, and sometimes it works really well – especially when I have the science-oriented Babylon. But other times, I lose dismally, because while I have a lot of science points, I neglected to build up my military or commerce well enough. 7 Wonders - Building Up Your Wonder | Savvy Game Night You could choose to collect a lot of resource cards to start, so you can easily build the more powerful cards in later ages, or you could focus on collecting cards with points right away. This works especially well with science or civilian cards, which often build off each other and let you build later cards for free. But if neither you nor your neighbors are building resource cards, you’re all going to be stuck later in the game. You constantly need to balance what you are playing against what your opponents are building up. We really like that the game allows for 6 or 7 players. So many games cut off at 5, which means someone has to team up or sit out when you have a game night of 3 couples. We also like that it is difficult to tell who is winning the game until the very end. In some games (Settler of Catan, I’m looking at you), it is often apparent pretty early on if you are totally out of the running, which makes the remainder of the game a lot less fun. 7 Wonders on Savvy Game Night

Mechanism:

7 Wonders is a card-drafting game played in three ages. In each age, players choose cards to help them build up one of the seven Wonders of the World. Some cards build up the player’s military, some give them reusable resources, and others provide victory or science points. Players interact primarily with their immediate neighbors, buying resources from them to help build cards and fighting them in military battles.

Number of Players:

2-7. There is a two-person variant, in which each player takes turn playing for the “dummy player,” but we aren’t big fans. It is better with 3+ players, and ideal with 4+.

Set-Up Time:

5-10 minutes.

Play Time for New Players:

1 hour – 1 1/2 hours, if you include the time it takes to explain the rules. There are a lot of symbols to learn, but once you’ve got a hang of how the cards work and what the icons mean, the game goes much more quickly.

Play Time for Experienced Players:

45 minutes. It is much easier to decide which card to keep when you understand all the symbols and have a better feel for how the cards interact with each other.

Age Range:

10+

Overall Rating for 7 Wonders: 10/10.

Psst: This post contains affiliate links. I only ever recommend products that I use myself.

Cards Against Humanity

Cards Against Humanity | Savvy Game Night

I’m spending 44 hours in New York City this week, catching up with some friends from high school. It’s been far too long since I’ve seen either of them, and I’m looking forward to hitting up a Broadway show, exploring the city and chatting late into the night.

These are the friends that I used to hang out with nearly every night the summer after our senior year of high school. And more often than not, we’d play games like Cranium and Apples to Apples until the early hours of the morning. Then we’d head home to sleep, work, get ready for college or do other summery things, and we’d be back for another round of games by evening.

Cards Against Humanity Questions | Savvy Game Night

Cards Against Humanity is like the grown-up version of Apples to Apples. If it had existed in 2005, we probably would have played it in place of the more “family-friendly” games we were playing. As it is, I wish I had room for the game in my suitcase for this mini-vacation – playing with them would have brought up so many nostalgic feelings!

Cards Against Humanity Answers

While I usually recommend getting all your board games from your local game store if you have one nearby, Cards Against Humanity is going to have to be the one exception. They don’t distribute the game anywhere but online for now (rumor has it that this is changing soon).

And if you don’t want to pay for the game? You don’t have to! The cards are available as a free PDF to download and print on the game’s website. The cards will be smaller and square, and possibly more difficult to play with, but it will save you some money if you don’t want to purchase the game (though $25 isn’t a bad price point to begin with!).

 

Cards Against Humanity Sample

 

Mechanism:

One player is the “judge.” They flip over a black card and read it aloud. Each other player must choose one white card from their hand that they think will best fill in the blank or answer the question on the black card, and submit it facedown. The judge shuffles the submissions, and reads them aloud before choosing their favorite. Whoever submitted the winning white card receives the black card as a “point.” The role of judge passes to the player on the left.

Number of Players:

3+. You can really play with any number of players, but we’ve found that the game works best with 4 -8ish.

Set-Up Time:

None. Shuffle and deal!

Play Time for New Players:

You can play for as little or as long as you’d like.

Play Time for Experienced Players:

Same as for new players.

Age Range:

17+

Overall Rating for Cards Against Humanity: 10 out of 10.

Psst: This post contains affiliate links. I only ever recommend products that I use myself.