Chocolate Hazelnut Pound Cake

I’ve been wanting to make a knock-off Nutella for awhile now, but that’s not the reason my chocolate hazelnut spread was the first thing I made in my new processor. Nope, it is because of this cake. When I was perusing the Food & Wine recipe catalog, I was drawn to the Nutella-Swirl Pound Cake. I had never made a pound cake, so this seemed like a good opportunity to try it out.

Being the food science nerd that I am, I did a little research into what makes a pound cake a pound cake, and found the answer in Ratio. A pound cake has equal parts butter, sugar, egg and flour. The butter and sugar must be mixed together first, followed by the eggs and then the flour.

Savvy Tip: Interestingly, a sponge cake also has equal parts butter, sugar, egg and flour. But, the sugar and egg are whipped together first… which is why the mixing order matters!

I replaced one stick of butter in the original recipe with 1/3 c of canola oil, and subbed in some whole wheat flour. I’ve been told that reducing the butter can sacrifice the flavor of the cake, but the oil and the chocolate hazelnut spread more than makes up for it.

NutellaCake2.jpg

The cake is rich, buttery and delicious. The one problem? The layers completely separated when I took the cake out of the pan to cool. I’m not entirely sure how or why this happened, but I know it still tastes amazing!

Chocolate Hazelnut Pound Cake

Inspired by Food & Wine’s Nutella-Swirl Pound Cake

1/2 c butter (1 stick), softened

1/3 c canola oil

1 1/4 c sugar

4 eggs

1/2 c whole wheat flour

1 c flour

2 c chocolate hazelnut spread or Nutella

Preheat oven to 350*F. Grease and flour a loaf pan.

Beat the butter, oil and sugar until fluffy.

Add the eggs one at a time, beating in each egg before adding the next. Mix in the flour in half-cup increments.

Pour 1/3 of the batter into the loaf pan, and top with half of the chocolate hazelnut spread. Layer on another 1/3 of the batter, followed by the rest of the chocolate hazelnut spread. Top with the rest of the batter.

Use a knife to “swirl” the chocolate spread into the top layer of batter.

Bake for 70-80 minutes, or until a knife inserted into the center comes out clean. Allow to cool for 15 minutes before removing from the pan. Allow to cool on a wire rack.

NutellaCake1.jpg

Any ideas for keeping the layers from falling apart when you take the cake out of the pan?

NutellaCake5.jpg

Um, yeah. That’s not right.

Edited to note: To avoid the splitting in the future, I think I might try swirling ALL the layers of batter/chocolate hazelnut spread together, rather than just the top layer. Hopefully that works!

Edited to note: If you choose to use commercial Nutella instead, you probably only need 1 or 1.5 cups–it is much sweeter and richer than the homemade spread!

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This post is part of a series featuring recipes from the FOOD & WINE archive. As a FOOD & WINE Blogger Correspondent, I was chosen to do four recipes a week from FOOD & WINE. I received a subscription to FOOD & WINE for my participation.

Comments

  1. says

    Uhhh, YUM!!!! This looks divine. I don’t have any tips on the cake splitting. How funny! You have to try making pound cake sometime with the butter. It is even more amazing :) My family has this recipe for 7-up cake, which is really just a lemony pound cake that uses a bit of 7up. It is sooooooo buttery and wonderful. The butter gives it THE BEST crust ever. mmmm

    • Julie @savvyeats says

      Yes! I was thinking I either need to do that, or swirl the whole thing at the end, rather than just the top layer…that’s what I’m trying next time! Thanks for the idea :)

  2. says

    It looks like it might be splitting because of the hazelnut spread. Did the spread become dry in the middle? Maybe the extended bake time makes the spread do something funky. Sometimes, recipes in magazines don’t work out quite as they promise to!

    • Julie @savvyeats says

      No, it didn’t dry out at all. I think I needed to swirl ALL the layers together, rather than just the top one…because the top layer didn’t split!

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