Freezing Waffles

An experiment to find the best way for freezing waffles, so you can have quick and easy breakfasts all week long!

Throughout elementary school, my weekday breakfast was almost always a toasted frozen waffle topped with peanut butter.  Sometimes we had pancake syrup on top.  Sometimes it was sliced bananas.  Sometimes it was both.

How to Freeze Waffles // Savvy Eats

In my efforts to stick with less processed foods, it has been a long time since I had a frozen waffle.  Last week, I set about making my own, experimenting until I found the method that gave the reheated waffles the best flavor and texture.

The Freezing Waffles Experiment

Methodology:

I let my waffles cool completely, and then froze two waffles for each of these six methods:

  1. Individually wrapped in foil before freezing.
  2. Individually wrapped in foil, then placed together in a plastic bag before freezing.
  3. Individually sealed in plastic bags before freezing.
  4. Individually wrapping in wax paper, then placed together in a plastic bag before freezing.
  5. Frozen in a single layer on a cookie sheet, then transferred to a plastic bag.
  6. Frozen all in the same plastic bag.

36 hours later, we reheated the waffles in our toaster oven set to “Medium Toast.”

Let the taste testing begin!

Freezing Waffles - Test Results // Savvy Eats

Results:

Method 1 and 2: The waffles wrapped in foil + plastic bag (method 2) were mushier than those wrapped only in foil (method 1). Method 2 is not the answer, and method 1 was only okay.

Method 3: The waffles sealed in individual freezer bags had a taste and texture very similar to those of fresh waffles (method 3). This one’s a winner.

Method 4: The waffles that were wrapped in wax paper and frozen in a plastic bag (method 4) were comparable to those wrapped only in foil. Eh. They were fine, but not as good as those sealed in individual bags or frozen on a cookie sheet. 

Method 5: The waffles that were frozen on the cookie sheet before being transferred to the bag (method 5) were similar in taste and texture to the fresh waffles, though they were not quite as good as the waffles from method 3. This is still a good option, though. 

Method 6: The waffles that were all frozen in the same bag (method 6) stuck together, and were crumbly when reheated. Nope, nope, nope!

Conclusions:

For taste and texture, the waffles were ranked as follows:

  1. (Best) Method 3: Individually sealed in plastic bags before freezing.
  2. Method 5: Frozen in a single layer on a cookie sheet, then transferred to a plastic bag.
  3. Method 4: Individually wrapping in wax paper, then placed together in a plastic bag before freezing.
  4. Method 1: Individually wrapped in foil before freezing.
  5. Method 2: Individually wrapped in foil, then placed together in a plastic bag before freezing.
  6. (Worst) Method 6: Frozen all in the same plastic bag.

However, there was not a large difference between waffles frozen in individual bags and those frozen on a cookie sheet.  Because the cookie sheet method requires fewer freezer bags and is therefore more environmentally-friendly, I will likely use a cookie sheet for freezing waffles.

Looking for some waffle recipes to freeze? Here are some of my favorites:

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