Potato, Carrot and Leek Latkes

The day before Thanksgiving, our holiday guests had to cancel on us.  Dan and I really didn’t want to have our huge feast, complete with a 19-pound turkey from Autumn’s Harvest and way too much food for four people, let alone two, alone, so we changed up our plans. Though we have some awesome local friends who invited us to their various Thanksgiving celebrations, we decided to stay in and take a “lazy day.”  We watched the parade, went to see Wreck-It Ralph in the theaters, and otherwise relaxed around the house, then invited our friends over for a big Thanksgiving feast on Friday.  It wasn’t what we had planned on, but we had a ton of fun. We ate, drank wine, played board games, and ate some more.

On Thursday, I wanted to cook something a little festive for dinner, but keep it simple and small (no leftovers — I knew we’d have plenty the next day!), so I decided to make up a hash of some of our Thanksgiving vegetables and top it with fried eggs.  It was delicious, but we decided it would be even more delicious in latke form.  So this week, now that we are past the ‘turkey-and-gravy-all-the-time’ feeling, I decided to make the latkes, just in time for Hannukah.

Potato, Carrot and Leek Latkes

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Cook Time: 45 minutes

Yield: About 18 latkes

Potato, Carrot and Leek Latkes

The carrot and leek addition makes these latkes a little sweeter and more flavorful than the traditional version. Serve them with unsweetened applesauce or a garlic aioli.

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds Yukon gold potatoes
  • 5 carrots
  • 1 leek
  • 5 eggs
  • 1/3 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2/3 cups canola oil, for frying
  • Applesauce or aioli, for topping

Instructions

  1. Shred the potatoes, carrots and leek in a food processor. There are two ways to squeeze out the moisture: Transfer the vegetables to a paper towel-lined mixing bowl. Place 2-3 more paper towels on top, then weigh them down with a can or other heavy item to press some of the moisture out of the vegetables. OR wrap the vegetables in cheesecloth and wring out the moisture. You may need to do this in batches to really get the water out. The more water you remove, the crispier your latkes will be!
  2. Allow the vegetables to rest for 3-5 minutes, then squeeze out even more water if you can.
  3. Mix the vegetables with the eggs, flour and salt.
  4. Heat the canola oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Press 1/4 – 1/2 c of the potatoes into a patty in the skillet. Cook 4-6 minutes, or until browned, then flip to brown the other side. Remove from the oil and place on a paper towel-lined plate. Repeat with the remaining latke mixture. Place paper towels between each layer of finished latkes to absorb some of the oil.
  5. Serve with applesauce or aioli.

Make Ahead and Storage

Lay out leftover latkes in a single layer on a cookie sheet and freeze. Once frozen, pack into a freezer container or bag. To reheat, place frozen latkes into a 425F oven and cook until warmed through and crisp, about 15-20 minutes.

http://www.savvyeat.com/potato-carrot-and-leek-latkes/

More great latke recipes:

Beet and carrot latkes from Eggs on Sunday

Caramelized onion latkes

Golden panko latkes from Food52

Old-fashioned latkes from Serious Eats

Potato-parsnip latkes from Smitten Kitchen

Sweet potato latkes from Turntable Kitchen

Comments

  1. says

    It took me a few tries with soggy latkes to learn that you have to try really hard to remove the water from the veggies, it’s good that you are really explicit in your directions about that step. Yukon Golds are my favorite kind of potatoes, so naturally buttery-tasting, and the carrots are a real upgrade to the latkes, too. I never would have thought of the leeks, but I’ll bet they are good, too. Do you use just the white part at the base of the stem? Just pinned this for later– thanks!

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