The Little Things #56

Too often, we get caught up in our day to day routines and forget to appreciate the little things in life.  In myLittle Things series, I like to honor the details that are making me happy today, and ask you to do the same!

The Little Things making me happy today are…

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1.  My travel tea kit.  I’m going to need it!

2.  Comfortable seats and free WiFi on Amtrak this morning.

3.  Little lettuce seedlings popping up in the cold frames.

4.  Funny emails from friends.

5.  Good books.

6.  The semi driver who pulled over to let us pass this morning because he was driving well under the speed limit.  Happy little random acts of kindness.

What little things are making you happy today?

You can be a part of “The Little Things: Reader Submissions”page! Send me a photo of one of the “little things” making you happy today, along with a short note. You do NOT have to be a blogger to take part, but if you have a blog, I will link back to you. Send your posts to me at savvyjulie@gmail.com


If you’ve submitted your own “Little Things” post, or simply support the series, consider adding this badge to your blog!

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Season to Taste: A Book Review

Season to Taste: How I Lost My Sense of Smell and Found My Way by Molly Birnbaum was the March Kitchen Reader selection and was chosen by chosen by Katherine Martinelli.

Molly Birnbaum’s Season to Taste has been on my “to read” list for ages, so I was thrilled to see it on the reading list for the Kitchen Reader this month.

The book examines Birnbaum’s experience with losing her sense of smell after a traumatic car accident.  As she struggles to come to terms with a an odorless world, she dives headfirst into learning as much as she can about how smell and aromas work and how to regain her sense of smell.  With all the scientific studies and interviews, the book had the potential to be dry, but Birnbaum’s personal narrative, artfully woven into the story, broke up the research and kept the pace of the book moving.  She clearly put a lot of time and research into this book, taking many of the tests and examinations she learned about herself, so she was able to include her own thoughs on much of the research.  In the end, it is not clear how she slowly regained her sense of smell, but then, I don’t think anyone really knows.

Overall, I give this memoir 4 stars out of 5.

More of my book reviews can be found here.